Publication Of Cancer Control 2015
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The third edition of Cancer Control (2005) is now available on line [http://www.cancercontrol.info]. Hard copy versions are in the mail. All members and those who register at the cancercontrol.info site will receive a free copy of the hardback version.

Indroduction to the Third Edition

There has been much talk in the cancer communities about setting targets such as the 25% reduction in premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases by 2025. We have used the first of our Cancer Control Surveys not to question the achievability of such an aim, nor to conduct a scientific survey, but to seek the opinions of a small number of people with respect to where they think the emphasis should lie if the 25/25 target is to be achieved. Not surprisingly, our responders answered the question from their own perspectives. Some focus on early detection and treatment – by far the most equent response, and others pointed to the need for innovative financing for lesser-resourced countries or a Global Fund to fight cancer worldwide. The full results of our first survey follow this introduction and make for interesting reading. In the third edition of Cancer Control we stay with the theme of cancer control planning which we developed in the previous edition. This time we look at how the World Health Organization directly assists countries with their cancer programmes and the underlining thoughts behind their methodology. The UICC gives us some valuable insight into the newly established International Cancer Control Partnership which aims to plug some of the gaps in planning capacity mong low- and middle-income countries. Another perspective comes from the United States’ Council on Foreign elations which makes the case for intervention on cancer by high-income countries. All of the solutions have one thing in common – they will require partnerships on a scale not seen before. And of course, a reduction in NCDs or cancer alone is not in everyone’s interests – the importance that several respondents give to tobacco control underlines this. Thus, our question might well have been “is the world ready for the degree of global cooperation that will be required?

There has been much talk in the cancer communities about setting targets such as the 25% reduction in premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases by 2025. We have used the first of our Cancer Control Surveys not to question the achievability of such an aim, nor to conduct a scientific survey, but to seek the opinions of a small number of people with respect to where they think the emphasis should lie if the 25/25 target is to be achieved. Not surprisingly, our responders answered the question from their own perspectives. Some focus on early detection and treatment – by far the most equent response, and others pointed to the need for innovative financing for lesser-resourced countries or a Global Fund to fight cancer worldwide. The full results of our first survey follow this introduction and make for interesting reading. In the third edition of Cancer Control we stay with the theme of cancer control planning which we developed in the previous edition. This time we look at how the World Health Organization directly assists countries with their cancer programmes and the underlining thoughts behind their methodology. The UICC gives us some valuable insight into the newly established International Cancer Control Partnership which aims to plug some of the gaps in planning capacity mong low- and middle-income countries. Another perspective comes from the United States’ Council on Foreign elations which makes the case for intervention on cancer by high-income countries. All of the solutions have one thing in common – they will require partnerships on a scale not seen before. And of course, a reduction in NCDs or cancer alone is not in everyone’s interests – the importance that several respondents give to tobacco control underlines this. Thus, our question might well have been “is the world ready for the degree of global cooperation that will be required to reach the target?” Of course, there are many other areas where cooperation is essential and some of these may be as important as actions directed specifically against cancer. Cancer Control would be interested in hearing the views of our readers with respect to the cooperation that will be needed to meet the existing targets and will consider establishing an online site to broaden the conversation.

Focusing on the management of cancer, we have an article from the International Atomic Energy Agency updating readers on its PACT programme; we look at the costs and priorities of current therapies, and have an assessment of “m-cancer” – how mobile phone technology and applications can aid cancer care. Close to this theme is the e-cancer project which uses the internet to provide training and online resources. But these approaches must ultimately result in actions that directly benefit patients if they are to be successful, and sometimes human beings need to meet and work directly together if their programmes are to be successful. In this edition we explore the experience of the THET programme that focuses on twinning programmes. On the clinical side, we have articles on liver cancer, the rising levels of lung cancer in China, as well as an update on the development of palliative care services in India and the psychosocial dimension in treating paediatric cancer from Brazil. Latin America also features in our “Regional initiatives” section along with contributions from the Philippines, Egypt and an update from the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control Congress which took place in Moscow. In short, there is much to think about in the 2015 edition and hopefully much that will improve our understanding of cancer care at its many different levels as well, perhaps, as some of the broader issues such as the ever-increasing divide between the rich and the poor, which, of course, includes access to health care. Disparities of all kinds are present in all countries to varying degrees and have a negative impact on development, of which an important component is health care. The UNDP now includes an equality measure in its index of development which gives an idea of the negative impact of such disparities. Please don’t forget to visit www.cancercontrol.info where you will have access to articles from the two previous editions of Cancer Control as well as more information about cancer control in emerging countries and the work of INCTR.

Ian Magrath, Editor-in-Chief, Cancer Control 2015
Tim Probart, Publisher, Cancer Control 2015

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